Professor Simon Appointed NBER Research Fellow

Professor David Simon  has been named an affiliate Faculty Research Fellow in the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)  Program on Children

http://www.nber.org/people/david_simon

The Program on Children “focuses on economic behavior related to children, child health, and child economic and social well being.” Professor Simon’s research interests include health inequality, policy and health capital accumulation, early life and childhood human capital accumulation, and public policy evaluation.

Econ Alumnus promoted to Full Professor at the University of Reading

Anupam Nanda, an ’06 PhD graduate of the Department of Economics, is being promoted to full professor at the University of Reading.

A full list of his publications can be found at https://www.henley.ac.uk/people/person/dr-anupam-nanda/, as well as his current biography:

Dr. Anupam Nanda is Associate Professor in Real Estate Economics and Academic Director of the Centre for intelligent Places at the Henley Business School, University of Reading, UK. He is also a Research Associate at the Walker Institute for Climate System Research. Previously, Anupam worked with the Market Intelligence group of Deloitte & Touche in Mumbai (Apr. 2008-Nov. 2009), where his focus area covered real estate and private equity sectors. He was at the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) in Washington DC (Apr. 2006-Apr. 2008), as Senior Research Economist, where his responsibilities included developing and implementing housing market research studies and was a member of the team forecasting state and metro area housing markets in US. Anupam has also taught undergraduate Economics and Public Finance at the University of Connecticut.

 

2017 Spring Awards Banquet

Uconn sealOn April 13, the department convened for an awards banquet that recognized the best among undergraduate and graduate students, as well as faculty. This year’s award recipients are:

Omicron Delta Epsilon inductees:

Matthew Braccio
Zachary Console
Matthew DeLeon
Jennafer Fugal
Benjamin Hamel
Henry Hooper
Daniel Rodrigues
Claudia Rodriguez
Nandhana Sajeev
Akwasi Sarpong
Michael Scalise
Austin Song
Connor Todd
Alexandra Torchigana


Undergraduate Awards

Louis D. Traurig Scholarship

Patrick Adams
Andrew Carroll
Joshua Essick
Kayla Joyce

Paul N. Taylor Memorial Prize

Matthew DeLeon

Rockwood Q. P. Chin Scholarship

William Johnston
Claudia Rodriguez
Alexander Rojas
Zihan Wang

Ross Mayer Scholarship

Tasneem Ahmed

Julia & Harold Fenton and Yolanda & Augustine Sineti Scholarship

Yiting Jiang

Kathryn A. Cassidy Economics Scholarship

Tianyi Li
Roy Masha
Di Wu

Charles Triano Scholarship

Jennafer Fugal


Graduate Awards

W. Harrison Carter Award

Tian Lou

Albert E. Waugh Scholarship

Andrew Ju

Abraham Ribicoff Graduate Fellowship

Mark McInerney

Timothy A. and Beverly C. Holt Economics Fellowship

Aaron Cooke
Michael DiNardi
Jingwei Huang
Samantha Minieri
Tao Song
Kevin Wood
Wei Zheng

Economics Department General Scholarship

Huarui Jing
Wensu Li
Xizi Li
Shilpa Sethia


Faculty Awards

Grillo Family Research Award

Nishith Prakash

Grillo Family Teaching Award

Talia Bar

Employee Appreciation Awards

Delia Furtado   10 years
Vicki Knoblauch   15 years
Kathleen Segerson   30 years

 

 

 

Congratulations to everyone!

 

Professor Prakash presents at the 6th NCID Research Workshop and at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid

Professor Nishith Prakash presented his paper “Do Criminally Accused Politicians Affect Economic Outcomes? Evidence from India” at the 6th NCID Research Workshop in Madrid, and at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid.

Professor Prakash was interviewed at the 6th NCID Research Workshop about his work:

HCEO Research Spotlight on Racial Profiling Research

Professor Stephen Ross and his coauthors, Jesse Kalinowski at Quinnipiac University and Matthew Ross at Ohio State University (both former Ph.D. students at UConn), have recently released on new working paper on racial discrimination in police traffic stops in Connecticut.

This research was selected by the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group at the University of Chicago to be featured in their research spotlight series. The spotlight article can be found at:

https://hceconomics.uchicago.edu/news/research-spotlight-endogenous-driving-behavior-veil-darkness-tests-racial-profiling

Professor Prakash publishes in Social Science & Medicine

Professor Nishith Prakash and his co-author Professor Kumar (Sam Houston State University) have had their paper titled “Effect of political decentralization and female leadership on institutional births and child mortality in Bihar” accepted for publication at Social Science & Medicine.

In this paper, they investigate the impacts of political decentralization and women reservation in rural local governance on institutional births and child mortality in the state of Bihar in India. Using difference-in-differences methodology, they find a significant positive association between political decentralization and institutional births. They also find that the increased participation of women at local governance led to increased survival rate of children belonging to richer households. They argue that their results are consistent with female leaders having policy preference for women and child well-being.

This project was funded by International Growth Center at London School of Economics (http://www.theigc.org).

Professor Agüero publishes in the Journal of Health Economics

Professor Jorge Agüero and his coauthor Trinidad Beleche have had their paper “Health Shocks and their Long-Lasting Impact on Health Behaviors: Evidence from the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic in Mexico” accepted for publication in the Journal of Health Economics.

Abstract: Worldwide, the leading causes of death could be avoided with health behaviors that are low-cost but also difficult to adopt. We show that exogenous health shocks could facilitate the adoption of these behaviors and provide long-lasting effects on health outcomes.

Specifically, we exploit the spatial and temporal variation of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in Mexico and show that areas with a higher incidence of H1N1 experienced larger reductions in diarrhea-related cases among young children. These reductions continue even three years after the shock ended. Changes in hand washing behaviors are behind these health improvements. Several robustness checks validate our findings and mechanism.